Sounds of artillery heard on SKorean island
Friday, November 26, 2021 1:43 AM

Related Stories



(Source: Associated Press/AP Online)By JIN-MAN LEE and FOSTER KLUG

YEONPYEONG ISLAND, South Korea - A South Korean official say sounds of artillery have been heard on the country's Yellow Sea island attacked earlier this week by North Korea.

It was not immediately clear where the artillery sounds were coming from.

An official at the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff says the sounds of artillery were heard twice on the island and that military officials are trying determine the details. The official spoke on condition of anonymity.

The sounds come as the North warns that U.S.-South Korean military drills planned for this weekend are pushing the peninsula to the brink of war.

It also comes after a U.S. military commander toured the wreckage from a North Korean artillery attack this week.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

YEONPYEONG ISLAND, South Korea (AP) - North Korea warned Friday that planned U.S.-South Korean military drills are pushing the peninsula to the brink of war as a U.S. military commander toured the wreckage of an island devastated by a North Korean artillery barrage.

Pyongyang's state news agency said drills this weekend involving South Korean forces and a U.S. nuclear powered supercarrier in Yellow Sea waters south of Tuesday's skirmish between the rival Koreas amount to a reckless move to target the North.

"The situation on the Korean peninsula is inching closer to the brink of war," the dispatch from the Korean Central News Agency said. "Gone are the days when verbal warnings are served only," the agency said, adding that North Korea's army and people are "now greatly enraged" and "getting fully ready to give a shower of dreadful fire."

In a strong show of solidarity with ally Seoul, Gen. Walter Sharp, the U.S. military commander in South Korea, paid a visit Friday to the island targeted by Tuesday's artillery attack.

Sharp wore a heavy camouflage jacket and a black beret as he walked down a severely damaged street strewn with debris from buildings. Around him were charred bicycles and shattered bottles of soju, a traditional Korean liquor.

Sharp said the attack on Yeonpyeong island was a clear violation of an armistice signed in 1953 at the end of the three-year Korean War. The island of military bases and a civilian population of 1,300 lies about 50 miles (80 kilometers) from South Korea's western port of Incheon, but only 7 miles (11 kilometers) from North Korean shores.

Four South Koreans - two marines and two civilians - were killed in the hour-long skirmish Tuesday after North Korea unleashed a hail of artillery on Yeonpyeong, but the island was quiet Friday morning, with most residents having evacuated to the mainland.

Marines with M-16 rifles patrolled a seawall, while others gazed toward North Korea from a guard post on a cliff. Technicians worked to restore communication lines. Several stray dogs barked near destroyed houses.

The heightened animosity between the Koreas is taking place as the North undergoes a delicate transition of power from leader Kim Jong Il to his son Kim Jong Un, who is in his late 20s and is expected to eventually succeed his ailing father.

South Korean President Lee Myung-bak has ordered reinforcements for about 4,000 troops on Yeonpyeong and four other Yellow Sea islands, as well as top-level weaponry for the soldiers and upgraded rules of engagement that would create a new category of response when civilian areas are targeted.

He also sacked his defense minister amid intense criticism over lapses in the country's response to the attack.

In scenes reminiscent of the Korean War 60 years ago, dazed residents of Yeonpyeong island this week have foraged through blackened rubble for pieces of their lives and lugged their possessions down eerily deserted streets strewn with bent metal.

"It was a sea of fire," islander Lee In-ku said Thursday, recalling the flames that rolled through the streets of this island that is home to military bases as well as a fishing community famous for its catches of crab. The spit of land had only six pieces of artillery.

North Korea blamed South Korean drills this week as the motivation behind its attack - but the South Korean president said the South could not afford to abandon such preparation now.

"We should not ease our sense of crisis in preparation for the possibility of another provocation by North Korea," spokesman Hong Sang-pyo quoted President Lee Myung-bak as saying. "A provocation like this can recur any time."

Washington and Seoul also ratcheted up pressure on China, North Korea's main ally and biggest benefactor, to restrain Pyongyang.

Without criticizing the North, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao responded by calling on all sides to show "maximum restraint" and pushed again to restart the six-nation talks aimed at persuading North Korea to dismantle its nuclear programs in exchange for aid. Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, meanwhile, canceled a trip to Seoul this week.

On Thursday, Lee accepted Defense Minister Kim Tae-young's offer to resign after lawmakers criticized the government, claiming officials were unprepared for the attack and that the military response was too slow.

Skirmishes between the Korean militaries are not uncommon, but North Korea's heavy bombardment of Yeonpyeong Island took hostilities to a new level because civilians were killed.

South Korean troops returned fire and scrambled fighter jets in response. Two South Korean marines and two construction workers were killed and at least 18 others wounded. South Korea has said casualties on the North Korean side were likely significant, but none were immediately reported by the country.

Marine Lt. Col. Joo Jong-wha acknowledged that the island is acutely short of artillery, saying it has only six pieces: the howitzers used in Tuesday's skirmish.

"In artillery, you're supposed to move on after firing to mask your location so that they don't strike right back at you," he told reporters. "But we have too few artillery."

The disputed waters have been the site of three other deadly naval skirmishes since 1999. However, the most costly incident was the sinking of a South Korean warship eight months ago that killed 46 sailors in the worst attack on South Korea's military since the war.

---

Foster Klug reported from Seoul. AP photographer David Guttenfelder in Yeonpyeong and writers Kwang-tae Kim, Seulki Kim, Kelly Olsen, Ian Mader and Jean H. Lee in Seoul also contributed to this report.

A service of YellowBrix, Inc.

 

Sponsors

Symbol :

Advertisement

Market news:

  • All-night shop-a-thon: Black Friday draws crowds Nov 26, 2021 11:32 AM

    • Bargain shoppers, braving rain or frigid weather, crowded the nation's stores in the wee hours of the night to get their hands on deals from TVs to toys on Black Friday.
    • In an encouraging sign for retailers and for the economy, more shoppers appeared to be buying for themselves than last year, when such indulgences were limited.
    • Brian Dunn, CEO of Best Buy Co., which started its holiday TV ads 11 days earlier this year than last year, reported customer counts were showing high single-digit percentage increase Friday morning compared last year.
      • Saudi forces arrest 149 al-Qaida suspects Nov 26, 2021 10:57 AM

        • RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi authorities said Friday they arrested 149 al-Qaida suspects in a months-long sweep and thwarted attacks inside the kingdom on government officials, media personalities and civilian targets.
        • Saudi Arabia's anti-terror campaign has largely crushed al-Qaida's operations in the kingdom since a series of attacks there that began in 2003.
        • Some key militants, however, fled across the southern border to Yemen, where the regional al-Qaida branch has re-established a stronghold from which to plot attacks on Saudi Arabia and beyond.
          • Russia opens key plant to destroy chemical weapons Nov 26, 2021 10:49 AM

            • POCHEP, Russia - Russia will miss a 2012 deadline for destroying all of its chemical weapons, officials said Friday as they inaugurated a major new plant to dispose of them.
            • Pochep will process nearly 19 percent of Russia's stockpile, or 7,500 tons of nerve agent used in aircraft-delivered munitions.
            • The plant, hidden in a dense birch forest, is key for Russia's commitment to destroy all of its chemical weapons by April 2012 as Russia deals with its vast arsenal of weapons of mass destruction.
              • Pakistan foils capital bomb plot; missiles kill 3 Nov 26, 2021 09:58 AM

                • ISLAMABAD - Police arrested two would-be suicide bombers planning to attack a mosque and a government building in Pakistan's capital Friday, as local officials said another suspected U.S. missile strike near the Afghan border killed three alleged insurgents.
                • The military has responded by launching offensives in the remote northwest where the insurgents are based, and the U.S. has increased its barrage of missile attacks on those strongholds out of reach of the Pakistani army.
                • Police officer Bin Yamin said the detained men were linked to the Pakistani Taliban in the South Waziristan region, where the army has been fighting the militants since last year.
                  • NKorea warns region is on brink of war Nov 26, 2021 09:15 AM

                    • YEONPYEONG ISLAND, South Korea - North Korea warned Friday that U.S.-South Korean plans for military maneuvers put the peninsula on the brink of war, and appeared to launch its own artillery drills within sight of an island it showered with a deadly barrage this week.
                    • The fresh artillery blasts were especially defiant because they came as the U.S. commander in South Korea, Gen. Walter Sharp, toured the South Korean island to survey damage from Tuesday's hail of North Korean artillery fire that killed four people.
                    • None of the latest rounds hit the South's territory, and U.S. military officials said Sharp did not even hear the concussions, though residents on other parts of the island panicked and ran back to the air raid shelters where they huddled earlier in the week as white smoke rose from North Korean territory.

                      More news


Advertisement

    Recent Estimates

AnalystFirm NameSymbolEPS Estimate
GEOXXXXX PAY$0.31
mrbilltraderXXXXX POT$1.15
XXXXXXXXXX OVTI$0.43
sam farahanXXXXX TECD$0.95
XXXXXXXXXX GSS$0.05
XXXXXXXXXX ABB$0.31
adfgafg ERTS($0.26)
XXXXXXXXXX SD$0.03
XXXXXXXXXX ATML$0.11
XXXXXXXXXX CBPO$0.32